Employment

People with Down’s syndrome have an immense range of qualities and skills. And yet, only 7% of people with learning disabilities are in paid work. Let’s change that!

We know that lots of people with Down’s syndrome who want to work, don’t have a paid job. In fact, in Scotland only around 7% of people with learning disabilities are in paid work compared with 74% of the general population.

In a recent survey, we asked members what needs to happen, they told us they wanted:

  • more job opportunities 
  • more support and training, such as job coaching
  • jobs and training tailored to the individual
  • Down’s Syndrome Scotland to raise awareness with Government and to push for more support and encouragement for employers 

We want to partner with employers and identify opportunities for people with Down’s syndrome.  We know the economic outlook is even more challenging now but people with Down’s syndrome can’t be put to the back of the queue.

It’s good for business employing someone with Down’s syndrome – they offer a wide range of skills and sought-after qualities and employers tell us that they have a really positive impact on the workforce and the workplace.  As we build forward to a new working world, their qualities of kindness, compassion, loyalty and determination are exactly what we need right now.

Please #TakeAStepForward with us and join our campaign to create more employment opportunities for people with Down’s syndrome living in Scotland.

Get in touch at takeastepforward.org.uk to discuss how you can get involved.

Our 4 Big Dreams

Employment

People with Down’s syndrome have an immense range of qualities and skills. And yet, only 7% of people with learning disabilities are in paid work. Let’s change that!

Health

People with Down’s syndrome have been hit hard by the pandemic. Before COVID-19 came along, we already knew that people with learning disabilities have a life expectancy 20 years lower than the general population. Let’s change that!

Transitions

COVID-19 has massively disrupted our school lives. The transition from school into adult life has become even more challenging for people with Down’s syndrome who already faced many hurdles. Let’s change that!

Community

Local communities have been at the heart of our response to the pandemic. People with Down’s syndrome want to be active members of their local communities, living well and independent. They are not as valued and included as they want to be. Let’s change that!